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EbarDP48

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Reply with quote  #46 

So we leave Cloudland SP and head North towards Chickamuga National Military Park.

Whats this?



As we're traveling along this nice little ridge on Lookout Mountain we come upon a group of ulta light pilots along the side of the road.



It looks interesting so we stop to get a better view and find out what the heck is going on.

Get Ready



Get Set



You know what comes next........









Nothing to it. Just like taking a step out your front door. But that first step is pretty steep and talk about dedication. This is certainly one of those " No turning back" sports.

Look way down below and you'll see him coming in for a landing on the air field.



They also pulled you up to higher elevations if you'd like.





And of course, Mike found some friends to play with.



Come on Mike, Let's roll....We're burning daylight!



Bert


 

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Bert   09 KTM 530 07 Triumph Tiger 1050  06 Kawasaki KLR650 07 Yamaha YZ 250 1976 Husky WR250 1978 Suzuki RM250 1981 Honda CM 400 W/Velorex Sidecar Because the ride shouldn't end just because the pavement does! May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. Harold McAlindon
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Reply with quote  #47 
Did I mention Bert goes to great lengths to get a good shot?  Meanwhile I'm standing on a platform with a deathgrip on the rail.

The laugh of the day was when the ultralight was spotted towing the hang-glider to a higher elevation so he could get a longer glide.  We both looked at each other in agreement that "surely nothing could go wrong with this situation".  Much like pull starting another bike with a rope ...


The next thing I know Bert has "that look" in his eyes.  Securing everything in his tankbag I knew he was ready for ... something.


Uh oh ...  ... I think he's caught Glider Fever.  While I think the VStrom is a great bike and can do many, many things I doubt it will fly like a glider.  Don't do it Bert !  (or if you do ... give it more gas!)

Luckily all ended well with a great photo.


Mike


EbarDP48

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Reply with quote  #48 
Quote:
Uh oh ...  ... I think he's caught Glider Fever.

 


I think I can, I think I can, I think I can...Will it to be so!

Bert

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Bert   09 KTM 530 07 Triumph Tiger 1050  06 Kawasaki KLR650 07 Yamaha YZ 250 1976 Husky WR250 1978 Suzuki RM250 1981 Honda CM 400 W/Velorex Sidecar Because the ride shouldn't end just because the pavement does! May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. Harold McAlindon
EbarDP48

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Reply with quote  #49 
We arrive at Chickamunga Battlefield National Military Park around noon and find the signs for the auto tour route. It was only fitting as that we were visiting on Memorial Day weekend. I originally had plans to visit Andersonville as well.



This reminded me of our tour through Gettysburg in the Fall of 2009.



Chickamauga Battlefield

The Battle of Chickamauga, fought September 19–20, 1863,[1] marked the end of a Union offensive in southeastern Tennessee and northwestern Georgia called the Chickamauga Campaign. The battle was the most significant Union defeat in the Western Theater of the American Civil War and involved the second highest number of casualties in the war following the Battle of Gettysburg.

  

 

The battle was fought between the Union Army of the Cumberland under Maj. Gen. William Rosecrans and the Confederate Army of Tennessee under Gen. Braxton Bragg, and was named for West Chickamauga Creek, which meanders near the battle area in northwest Georgia (and ultimately flows into the Tennessee River about 3.5 miles (5.6 km) northeast of downtown Chattanooga).





After his successful Tullahoma Campaign, Rosecrans renewed the offensive, aiming to force the Confederates out of Chattanooga. In early September, Rosecrans consolidated his forces scattered in Tennessee and Georgia and forced Bragg's army out of Chattanooga, heading south. The Union troops followed it and brushed with it at Davis's Cross Roads. Bragg was determined to reoccupy Chattanooga and decided to meet a part of Rosecrans's army, defeat it, and then move back into the city. On September 17 he headed north, intending to attack the isolated XXI Corps. As Bragg marched north on September 18, his cavalry and infantry fought with Union cavalry and mounted infantry, which were armed with Spencer repeating rifles.
 
 


 
Fighting began in earnest on the morning of September 19. Bragg's men strongly assaulted but could not break the Union line. The next day, Bragg resumed his assault. In late morning, Rosecrans was misinformed that he had a gap in his line. In moving units to shore up the supposed gap, Rosecrans accidentally created an actual gap, directly in the path of an eight-brigade assault on a narrow front by Confederate Lt. Gen. James Longstreet.

 

 
Longstreet's attack drove one-third of the Union army, including Rosecrans himself, from the field. Union units spontaneously rallied to create a defensive line on Horseshoe Ridge, forming a new right wing for the line of Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, who assumed overall command of remaining forces. Although the Confederates launched costly and determined assaults, Thomas and his men held until twilight. Union forces then retired to Chattanooga while the Confederates occupied the surrounding heights, besieging the city.




Background

In his successful Tullahoma Campaign in the summer of 1863, Rosecrans moved southeast from Murfreesboro, Tennessee, out-maneuvering Bragg and forcing him to abandon Middle Tennessee and withdraw to the city of Chattanooga, suffering only 569 Union casualties along the way.[5] General-in-chief Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck and President Abraham Lincoln were insistent that Rosecrans move quickly to take Chattanooga. Seizing the city would open the door for the Union to advance toward Atlanta and the heartland of the South. Chattanooga was a vital rail hub (with lines going north toward Nashville and Knoxville and south toward Atlanta), and an important manufacturing center for the production of iron and coke, located on the navigable Tennessee River. Situated between Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Raccoon Mountain, and Stringer's Ridge, Chattanooga occupied an important, defensible position.[6]
 
 

Although Braxton Bragg's Army of Tennessee had about 52,000 men at the end of July, the Confederate government merged the Department of East Tennessee, under Maj. Gen. Simon B. Buckner, into Bragg's Department of Tennessee, which added 17,800 men to Bragg's army, but also extended his command responsibilities northward to the Knoxville area. This brought a third subordinate into Bragg's command who had little or no respect for him.[7] Lt. Gen. Leonidas Polk and Maj. Gen. William J. Hardee had already made their animosity well known. Buckner's attitude was colored by Bragg's unsuccessful invasion of Buckner's native Kentucky in 1862, as well as by the loss of his command through the merger.[8] A positive aspect for Bragg was Hardee's request to be transferred to Mississippi in July, but he was replaced by Lt. Gen. D.H. Hill, a general who did not get along with Robert E. Lee in Virginia.[9]



The Confederate War Department asked Bragg in early August if he could assume the offensive against Rosecrans if he were given reinforcements for Mississippi. He demurred, concerned about the daunting geographical obstacles and logistical challenges, preferring to wait for Rosecrans to solve those same problems and attack him.[10] He was also concerned about a sizable Union force under Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside that was threatening Knoxville. Bragg withdrew his forces from advanced positions around Bridgeport, which left Rosecrans free to maneuver on the northern side of the Tennessee River. He concentrated his two infantry corps around Chattanooga and relied upon cavalry to cover his flanks, extending from northern Alabama to near Knoxville.[11]



River of Death

The campaign and major battle take their name from West Chickamauga Creek. In popular histories, it is often said that Chickamauga is a Cherokee word meaning "river of death".[12] Peter Cozzens, who has written arguably the most definitive book on the battle, This Terrible Sound, wrote that this is the "loose translation".[13] Glenn Tucker presents the translations of "stagnant water" (from the "lower Cherokee tongue"), "good country" (from the Chickasaw) and, "river of death" (dialect of the "upcountry Cherokee"). Tucker claims that the "river of death" came by its name not from early warfare, but from the location that the Cherokee contracted smallpox.[14] James Mooney, in Myths of the Cherokee, wrote that Chickamauga is the more common spelling for Tsïkäma'gï, a name that has "lost any meaning in Cherokee and appears to be of foreign origin."[15]


So now you know a little bit more about Chickamugua than you did before.

Bert



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Bert   09 KTM 530 07 Triumph Tiger 1050  06 Kawasaki KLR650 07 Yamaha YZ 250 1976 Husky WR250 1978 Suzuki RM250 1981 Honda CM 400 W/Velorex Sidecar Because the ride shouldn't end just because the pavement does! May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. Harold McAlindon
toolguy1

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Reply with quote  #50 
Bert,
You should have been a teacher, you made that interesting, mine were always BORING.

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Reply with quote  #51 
As we rode through what now is a beautiful wooded and manicured area I'm looking left and right at all the signs indicating which division fought from where, who camped where, what was set here and there and suddenly the beauty is masked by a sadness of all the violence, pain and suffering that the area had seen in that horrible battle. 

Maybe I'm just silly but places like that make me feel rather insignificant. 

Mike
EbarDP48

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Reply with quote  #52 
We left Chickamunga and headed east toward Ellijay.
Mike stopped me at one point and said he had a bolt come out of his headlight assembly.



No Problem, We'll just stop at the next hardware store and get a metric bolt to replace it.
"I'll just call and find out what size it is" says Mike.
"I happen to have the BMW shop right here on speed dial"



"And what size is it" Mike asked.
I'm thinking, I'm sure it's a 6 or 7 mm bolt. We don't need no stinkin BMW parts man to answer this question.

We stop in Dalton at an Ace and I ask Mike to watch the bikes as I go inside and buy both a 6 and 7 mm bolt. I come back outside to find that both are too small.
I return back inside and shake my head. How can this be a 8mm? I find the 8mm, stand in line again as this was the happening spot in Dalton today and return outside to try it out. Right size...wrong pitch.
I return to the store and buy the correct pitch, replace the bolt and feel good about myself..Until Mike says,"Yup, that was the size the BMW parts man said it would be"
I guess I should have asked.

We continue on and make our way past Fort Mountain State park.



Unfortunately, this is the last picture I'd take on our trip as the next town we landed in was Ellijay Georgia and that's where I received the phone call that cut short our trip.
I'm not really complaining as we packed quite a bit into our 2 1/2 days of riding.
And besides, it gives me another trip to plan to North Georgia.
Mike had not been through many of the areas we traveled.
I always get enjoyment out of watching someone else ride some of the nice roads I've already ridden.
This is the end to part 1...Part two will have to come at a later date.
Bert


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Bert   09 KTM 530 07 Triumph Tiger 1050  06 Kawasaki KLR650 07 Yamaha YZ 250 1976 Husky WR250 1978 Suzuki RM250 1981 Honda CM 400 W/Velorex Sidecar Because the ride shouldn't end just because the pavement does! May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. Harold McAlindon
rjohnson

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Reply with quote  #53 
Very good ride reports, gentlemen.
 
Thanks!

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Reply with quote  #54 
Little known fact: 

It is a requirement that each BMW owner call the Mother Ship at some point during each trip to insure the masters are OK with your use of the bike.  
 
Plus it let me make the appt for my last warranty required service visit since the speedo-computer was flashing the service count-down at me at each and every start-up !   We had some good laughs at what the bike's computer was probably storing as far as vibrations per mile and dust content indicating my potential abuse ... resulting in no future warranty work for me.  Just kidding of course ... but you know how conversations go while doing repairs in the middle of nowhere.  That's the fun of riding buddies ... help and abuse on the same plate.  Luckily he did not notice I had not changed my high-beam fluid before the trip

Oh, don't let Bert fool you.  He let it slip that he made several trips into the ACE store because they had the AC cranking and it was a bit warm out in the parking lot.  Now that I think about it ... I noticed the tell-tale color around his mouth that screams I just had a nice ice cold orange Fanta drink and those crumbs (he said it was dirt) sure looked a lot like moon pie crumbs.  Suddenly it all starts to make sense.  Hey ... maybe that bolt didn't vibrate out at all ! 


Seriously, it was a fun ride and Bert was a great guide.  Each stop brought an exchange of grins that showed we were both having fun.  I wound up covering 1,423 miles and I'd leave tomorrow to do it again.

Thanks for the tour Bert!



Mike 


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