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EbarDP48

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Reply with quote  #31 
Let's post a few more from Barbers shall we


The Honda NS 400 R 2 stroke



Honda NS400R 

In 1983 Freddie Spencer, riding for Honda, became the youngest 500cc World Champion ever. Two years later, in belated celebration, Honda released the NS400, a bike claimed to be a road-going replica of Spencer's machine. The result is a fast, small, very light, two-stroke sports bike, beautifully finished with quite outstanding handling and road-holding. It may be 100cc smaller and considerably less powerful than the brutal all-or-nothing factory racer but they genuinely do have enough in common to warrant the Grand Prix replica tag. Like the racer, the NS400 is a liquid-cooled, three cylinder two-stroke of an unusual configuration, a V3.

Weighing only 359lb with a 54.5in wheel-base, the NS is the lightest and quickest bike in its class. It is fast, nimble and responsive. You can change lines on it as quickly as on a genuine racer.

Unlike many sporting two-strokes, the power the NS makes is not that peaky or rough. Honda use their own version of an exhaust power valve called AT AC (auto-controlled torque amplification chambers) on the front two cylinders to help the power spread at low revs. Even so there is little or no acceleration below 5,000rpm but there is a gradual build up between 5,000 and 7,000rpm, at which point it starts accelerating Ike crazy, screaming revs all the way to the redline. Surprisingly, it does this smoothly. If any two-stroke can be said to have manners, then the NS has more than most.

Peak power is at 10,000rpm, and it falls away immediately afterwards. Kept on the boil between 7,000 and 10,000rpm through six close gears, it is an indecently quick bike. Anywhere between 50 and 100ph, typically piling on the speed out of a comer, it will embarrass even 1000cc machines with the sheer fury of its acceleration. Honda have designed the perfect rolling chassis for their potent motor. On road or track, the handling is always sharp and precise. The steering is quick and comfortable and the bike has excellent brakes.
 
 
How about the funky Aprilia 6.5 Moto
 


Tere's lots of race bikes here.
How about a little Jawa Ice..Check out the handlebars that allow them to get waaaaay down in the corners.




Or this Honda 750 Dirt Tracker



Bubba Shobert's flat-tracker

 Harley-Davidson has dominated the AMA’s Grand National Championship since the inception of the series in 1954. But there was a time in the mid-1980s when Honda took over as the series king—winning four championships in a row.

This is the bike that made it happen: the RS750.

This actually was Honda’s second attempt at building a flat-track bike. The first was the NS750, based on a bored-out version of Honda’s street-going CX500 motor. The company campaigned that bike in 1981 and ’82, and it managed to win one race.

Then Big Red used all it had learned to create the purpose-built RS750 for the next season. The new dirt-tracker made several shakedown runs in the 1983 Grand National Championship, even winning the Du Quoin Mile with rider Hank Scott at the controls.

By 1984, Honda was ready to go championship-hunting in earnest. The company hired ’82 champ Ricky Graham and Bubba Shobert to make a full assault on the title aboard RS750s.

Honda’s air-cooled, V-twin, 749.5cc powerplant clearly benefited from close study of the Harley XR750, introduced in 1972. It is, for instance, no coincidence that the RS750 ended up with identical bore and stroke dimensions to the Harley—79.5mm x 75.5mm.

But there were significant differences in the bikes as well. The Honda, developed a decade later, came with an overhead camshaft and four-valve heads. The Harley used (and continues to use) pushrods and two valves.

That newer technology appeared to give Honda an edge, especially in horsepower. But in dirt-track racing, getting that horsepower to the ground has always been the important part.

Honda clearly got that part of the equation right, too. In ’84, the first year of the full factory effort, Graham edged out Shobert by a single point to win the title and give Honda a 1-2 series finish. Then Shobert, riding this bike, owned by Chris Carter of Menlo Park, California, as well as other machines, reeled off three consecutive championships from 1985 though ‘87.

These days, Shobert’s RS750 is on display in the Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum on the grounds of the AMA headquarters in Pickerington, Ohio. It is shown just as it was when Shobert won his final Grand National race—the 1988 Du Quoin Mile.
 
 
 
They even had Jeff Wards SuperMoto here.



Be sure and check out where the footpeg contacts the pavement



Bob and Tim check out the old Guzzi. This must have been an adventure tourer...check out the custom box.


 
While Tom and Robert check out this old Indian
 


__________________
Bert   09 KTM 530 07 Triumph Tiger 1050  06 Kawasaki KLR650 07 Yamaha YZ 250 1976 Husky WR250 1978 Suzuki RM250 1981 Honda CM 400 W/Velorex Sidecar Because the ride shouldn't end just because the pavement does! May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. Harold McAlindon
EbarDP48

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Reply with quote  #32 
Now where were we....ah yes Barbers picture report....

Robert looks over a nice Cushman. Seems he had a couple of these as well.



And we talked about this bike a few weeks ago in the "20 questions" thread. Seems the importer wanted to build a more powerful Ossa and the easiest was was to morph two Ossa 250s together.. And what do you get? A Yankee Z 500cc enduro.



It's hard to walk through Barbers and not hear someone claim...I had a bike like that some years ago!





How about a sweet AJS road racer. Seen one of these around your town lately?



Cool bikes are sitting everywhere.







I always liked this Honda GB500..I'd still like to have one in the garage.


GB500 Story
In the late '80's, Honda experimented with a number of very unusual motorcycles. The GB500 Tourist Trophy was one of them. Originally marketed in Japan as a 400, it was exported to the US, Europe and Australia as a 500. It was a moderate success in Japan, but in the US sales were hindered by the American love for large engines and dislike of the fairly high price tag.

The design used a 4 stroke dirt bike motor that was by that time already famous for its near unbreakability. That thoroughly modern, four valve hemi single was wrapped in a vintage look tube frame and wire wheels, with what some consider to be the world's most beautiful gas tank. The look is pure vintage while actually copying no particular vintage model.

The Tourist Trophy name comes from the most famous road race of mid-century motorcycling, the Isle of Man Tourist Trophy competition. This is a tight race on narrow twisty roads through the towns and villages of the Isle of Man (between England and Ireland) where quick steering and precise handling works much better than huge horsepower. It was dominated for many years by single cylinder 500cc racebikes with "the look" that the GB500 copied.

In the US, the GB was considered too small and too slow. Sales were slow too. GB's were only imported for two years, 1989 and 1990. By the time the new inventory was gone from the showrooms it had already become known as a cult bike. Today, a good GB sells for as much or more than it did new, in 1990.

 
 
 
I'll post more later.
Bert

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Bert   09 KTM 530 07 Triumph Tiger 1050  06 Kawasaki KLR650 07 Yamaha YZ 250 1976 Husky WR250 1978 Suzuki RM250 1981 Honda CM 400 W/Velorex Sidecar Because the ride shouldn't end just because the pavement does! May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. Harold McAlindon
swampy

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Reply with quote  #33 
The cool thing about Barbers is that it's not brand specific.

There are many museums that have a primary focus on this make or that. Barbers isn't about a make.... it's about ALL bikes...

THAT's one thing that makes it a great destination!



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jakbrand

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Reply with quote  #34 
Bert,

Did Barber's have a KLR650 on display?   1987 KLR could be considered vintage.

Great photos!   Keep 'em coming.



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DangerousDad47

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Reply with quote  #35 
I'm surprised that there wasn't a Penton 125 Six Day, or a Husky, or a CZ, or a Maico and on. I guess you have to stop somewhere.

Although the Chitty Chitty Bang Band bike did not have any Yellow Footpegs ( as yet ) it did sport the prototype Yellow Luggage Rack. The price will be $ 6.95 plus shippin and maybe some Obama taxes.

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Yaller Foot Pegs $#8.95 plus shippin ( Damn gas )
Snap Off Foot Peg Company
But wait....
Due to the current economy shippin has gone up


Tiger Tom
Turn Signal Tom
Pops

05 KLR 650 (a future in farkling)
01 KTM 520 Tagged
77 CanAm 250 Qualifier
73 Penton 125 Six Day ( Restored )
95 Triumph Tiger( First DDS Tiger )

If your gonna be stupid you better be tough.( Damn, I gotta start workin out )

If it looks deep...it's deeper. Yep, ask Johnny Africa.

The best way out of most situations is more gas.
EbarDP48

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Reply with quote  #36 
Here's a Suzuki Titan 500



You know..Honda really does take R&D to a new level from time to time?
Take a look at this NR 750

Honda's NR (New Racing) V-four motorcycle engine series started in 1979 with the 500cc NR500 Grand Prix racer that used oval pistons [1]. This was followed during the 1980s by a 750cc endurance racer version known as the NR750. The oval piston concept allowed for eight valves per cylinder which generated more power due to the increased air/fuel mixture throughput and compression. In 1992 Honda produced around 300 street versions of a 750cc model, the NR (often mistakenly referred to as the NR750), with a 90-degree V angle. Whereas the NR500 had used an oval piston with straight sides, the road going NR750 used an elliptical piston with curved long sides. The bike became the most expensive production bike at the time when it was selling for $50,000 and with the rarity, nowadays they rarely change hands.
 
 
The origins of the 'NR' series of motorcycles lie in Honda's return to Grand Prix motorcycle racing in the late 1970s following an absence since their highly successful participation in the 1960s. During the absence of Honda, Grand Prix racing had come to be dominated by two-stroke machines that could easily attain a higher specific output than a four-stroke equivalent. Honda had long preferred to concentrate on four-stroke development and therefore decided to produce such a machine to challenge their Japanese rivals.
 

To achieve this aim Honda could have looked to follow their 1960's practice of increasing the number of cylinders to produce more power. However, Grand Prix rules at the time required a configuration with maximum of four combustion chambers. Honda engineers therefore came up with the highly innovative solution of constructing a 'V8' engine in the form of a four cylinder. This was achieved by designing an oval piston that allowed a total of 8 valves per cylinder, and connecting two con-rods to each piston. Such a configuration led to almost unprecedented complexity in terms of engine design, with 32 valves and eight con-rods incorporated into the dimensions of a regular four cylinder motorcycle engine.

Development and testing of the new engine proved fraught with difficulty (prompting some motorcycle journalists of the time to comment that NR meant "Never Ready") but Honda eventually succeeded in meeting the original performance criteria for the engine. The final 500cc race version was capable of developing approximately 130 bhp at over 20,000rpm. However, this rarely translated into success on the track for the NR500, and Honda subsequently redirected its Grand Prix campaign in the form of the NS500 two-stroke machine.

In 1983/84, a 250cc V-twin using a supercharger and the 8-valve oval piston technology was developed but never seen in public.

The oval piston concept continued in the NR750 endurance bike, which made a brief appearance during the 1980s. Finally the technology was transferred to the road, at least on a limited basis, in the bike simply referred to as the 'NR'. One of the most expensive road motorcycles yet offered for sale, a limited number of the NR models was sold in the early 1990s with a 750cc version of the engine capable of developing approximately 125 bhp at 14,000rpm in standard form. Although a heavy machine by modern standards, it incorporated a range of technologies and design features that have now appeared on more regular models.
 
 
And Tim said..."Hey that's a copy of my first bike way up there on top"



Maybe you've seen your first bike as well..If not hold on as there's plenty more to see





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Bert   09 KTM 530 07 Triumph Tiger 1050  06 Kawasaki KLR650 07 Yamaha YZ 250 1976 Husky WR250 1978 Suzuki RM250 1981 Honda CM 400 W/Velorex Sidecar Because the ride shouldn't end just because the pavement does! May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. Harold McAlindon
EbarDP48

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Reply with quote  #37 
Quote:
Did Barber's have a KLR650 on display?   1987 KLR could be considered vintage.


Jack, to your question regarding a KLR..This old Harley Davidson Military version with a Rotax engine is about as close as we got to seeing a KLR on display.


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Bert   09 KTM 530 07 Triumph Tiger 1050  06 Kawasaki KLR650 07 Yamaha YZ 250 1976 Husky WR250 1978 Suzuki RM250 1981 Honda CM 400 W/Velorex Sidecar Because the ride shouldn't end just because the pavement does! May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. Harold McAlindon
EbarDP48

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Reply with quote  #38 
By the way..It seems this Honda NR750 could be one of the most expensive (semi) production bikes in history. I did a little research and the only one I found had an asking price of $65,000



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Bert   09 KTM 530 07 Triumph Tiger 1050  06 Kawasaki KLR650 07 Yamaha YZ 250 1976 Husky WR250 1978 Suzuki RM250 1981 Honda CM 400 W/Velorex Sidecar Because the ride shouldn't end just because the pavement does! May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. Harold McAlindon
EbarDP48

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Reply with quote  #39 

So let's post a few more tonight. We're only at about the half way point and still have a long way to go. You can see how it will take more than just a courtesy stop to see these gems.

So here we find ourselves at the early years section. There where many sweet rides here. Can you imagine riding some of these machines down you're favorite single trail?

We finally find a few that even Robert didn't have.....I'm not sure about Tom


I'll just let the pictures speak for themselves in this post.
After the ones you've seen so far...it makes you wonder what they pay for insurance in a place like this!!





















Bert




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Bert   09 KTM 530 07 Triumph Tiger 1050  06 Kawasaki KLR650 07 Yamaha YZ 250 1976 Husky WR250 1978 Suzuki RM250 1981 Honda CM 400 W/Velorex Sidecar Because the ride shouldn't end just because the pavement does! May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. Harold McAlindon
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Reply with quote  #40 
Awesome Barber Pics! We've been there twice and both times they had different bikes on display. I asked some of the staff and they said the displays are on rotation so returning visitors will have a new experience each visit. There are a whole bunch more bikes that go to another storage location and they are always aquiring more bikes and making them museum ready.

One visit, I believe it was 2006, there was a KLR 650 Military Diesel Conversioin on display. It was more than just Heffty Bag Green. It was US Military spec. ..../090009/USAGRN/BR549 green.

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01 Suzuki DR-Z250
06 Triumph Tiger
96 Yamaha XT225 (Mel's bike she doesn't ride)
79 XS650F Rode it from 1985 to 94 Needs TLC
75 DT250B Since I was 19 

"Life Changing is when you no longer have a Bike"
EbarDP48

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Reply with quote  #41 
Tonight's post will feature a salute to our Military.
Gung Ho and Get "R" Done boys!

Just a little something for getting around the base



I posted this one earlier. It's a Harley with a Rotax 650 engine.




Gotta love the olive green and tan colors





Guns mounted on Motorcycles..Ya gotta love these.





And here comes the Navy



Bert

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Bert   09 KTM 530 07 Triumph Tiger 1050  06 Kawasaki KLR650 07 Yamaha YZ 250 1976 Husky WR250 1978 Suzuki RM250 1981 Honda CM 400 W/Velorex Sidecar Because the ride shouldn't end just because the pavement does! May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. Harold McAlindon
wingam00

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Reply with quote  #42 
Now Bert you are just showing off, I am glad you are.

Thanks

Mark   


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EbarDP48

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Reply with quote  #43 
Funny...I'e always said that Harley's were boat anchors. Check out the tank.
Bert


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Bert   09 KTM 530 07 Triumph Tiger 1050  06 Kawasaki KLR650 07 Yamaha YZ 250 1976 Husky WR250 1978 Suzuki RM250 1981 Honda CM 400 W/Velorex Sidecar Because the ride shouldn't end just because the pavement does! May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. Harold McAlindon
swampy

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Reply with quote  #44 
A. There is never a "bad" Barber picture

B. There is never a "bad" Barber post.

C. There is never a bike not-worth-seeing.

D. I think Tom bought one of these new off the dealer floor, didn't he?



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EbarDP48

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Reply with quote  #45 
I'll try to push through these last Barbers pictures. I know how boring it must be to drool over them.
So here goes...

All of a sudden it's 1969 again and the "Easy Rider" hits the streets. This was a reproduction



If you look closely at this picture you'll see anOld, dusty, crusty, rode hard and put up wet peice of Bike History....But enough about Tom.
Check out this bike that was ridden around the world.



And here's the companion bike that traveled along.



Tim stood and drooled a long time looking at this bike. He's got an SL350 in his basement and wishes it looked as cherry.



Tom Hoping I caught his reflection in the tank



Not many Bultaco road racers out there



How about this bike. Ever heard of a Munch 4?




There is an old American motoring adage which states that there is no substitute for cubic inches. Basically it means that when it comes to engine performance, the bigger the engine's capacity the better. This theory must certainly have been close to German Friedl Mlinch's heart when he set out to build a super new motor cycle during the mid-1960s. 

 For maximum performance Munch decided to use a car engine and after a good look at all the available options he settled for the four-cylinder unit normally fitted in the NSU Prinz.  Getting his project off the ground was a tricky business, however, and Mlinch's subsequent history is strewn with financial problems, failed business partnerships and a great deal of heartache, soul searching and confusion. Whatever his commercial problems, however, Munch's bikes are well worth a second look.  Probably the best known of all the Munch models is the standard 1200TTS of the mid-1970s, a super-bike in every sense of the word. The power unit was a single-overhead-camshaft NSU engine of 1177cc which punched out 88bhp at 6000 rpm, with two twin-choke Weber carburettors, or 100bhp at 7500 rpm in its later, fuel injected form.

The 1200TTS used a four-speed gearbox developed from the now obsolete German Horex Imperator vertical twin of the late 1950s. The gearchange, while effective, was somewhat rough, however, a sign that the mating of car engine to motor cycle gearbox was not without its problems. For those rather braver riders who required even more performance, modified 1300 and even 1400cc versions were also available.  In appearance, the 1200TTS was an imposing machine. It carried a large, 5-1/2 gallon fuel tank, which gave it a strange hump-backed look in spite of its 55-1/2 inch wheelbase. A nice touch was the addition of a huge all-enclosed final drive chain, complete with its own oil bath.  The earliest versions of the Munch were reputed to handle badly; the combination of a heavy car engine and lightweight frame needed a great deal of sorting to work efficiently. By the mid-1970s, however, the handling of the 1200TTS models had improved beyond recognition, but was still hardly in the sports category, of course. Weighing 630 lb meant that the big machine could not be thrown around like a lightweight and its real forte was as a high speed cruiser. 

 The roadholding, however, was first class, as the rear suspension made use of highly effective Koni damper units, while the front forks were the work of either the British Rickman or Italian Ceriani companies, depending on the owner's order. Braking was also very effective, the front wheel being equipped with a huge, 12 inch, magnesium drum brake.

The last Munch fours had Marzocchi forks and dual front discs, but very few of these were ever made.  By the end of the 1970s, however, recurring financial problems meant that Friedl Munch was forced to sell his company and bring production of his beloved machines to a standstill.  Munch is nothing if not a dedicated man, however, and at the Cologne Show of 1978 he announced details of his new company and then showed the startled world his latest creation. It was powered by a 1400cc NSU car engine fitted with a turbocharger and fuel injection, for which a power output of 143bhp was claimed. The new bike bore the Horex name, a make which had played an important part in Friedl's life as a young man. Only one question remained, however. Was the world ready for a machine with that kind of performance? Only time would tell.
 


Another sweeeeet Guzzi



And here's another interesting bike. The 1970 Indian Velo 500. Check the info after the picture.There were two of them here at Barbers.
 

 
 

Sometimes it’s hard to say goodbye. And that was particularly true in the years after the original Indian Motocycle Company went out of business in 1953.

For decades, the legendary brand had battled with Harley-Davidson for domination of the U.S. market, and the nation’s racetracks. So when the end came for the company, Indian’s fiercely loyal fans had a hard time accepting it.

One of those in a position to do something about that was former West Coast Indian distributor and motorcycle magazine publisher Floyd Clymer, who acquired the rights to the Indian name in 1967 and made a number of attempts to revive the marque.

Clymer worked with two German firms, Munch and Horex, to build prototypes of an updated Indian, but neither of those projects got beyond that stage.

Eventually, Clymer succeeded in creating this machine, the Indian Velo 500. It combined an Italian frame and other components with an engine from the British Velocette factory. And in 1969, he offered the Indian Velo 500 to the public.

The bike was powered by a 499cc, single-cylinder, four-stroke engine that produced an estimated 34 horsepower at 6,200 rpm. It had a four-speed transmission, wet clutch and chain drive. An Amal carb handled the fuel-mixing chores, while the drum brakes were sourced from Grimeca.

Unfortunately, the Indian Velo came along at a time when the motorcycle world was rapidly changing. Indeed, the year it was first offered to the public, Honda unveiled the four-cylinder 750, and things would never be the same again.

Estimates of the number of Indian Velos produced range from 100 to 150 before Clymer’s death in 1970 brought an end to the effort.

This particular Indian Velo is owned by Arvid Myhre of Stockton, New Jersey, who has kept it in original condition.

“I picked it up because it was obvious that it would be a rare bike,” he says. “It was a departure from the classic British single, and I like that.”

 

rare bikes at every corner at Barbers..Like the Silk 700



Well go road racing next post. Stay tuned.
Bert

 

The Silk 700S was launched in 1975 and featured the new engine in a specially designed steel tubular frame made by Spondon of Derbyshire, who also made the forks.[3] At a cost of £1355 it was expensive and more than any other production motorcycles of the time.[5] The 700S continued to be developed at the Darley Abbey works in Derbyshire, along with the SPR Production Racing version.[2] Production was slow, with just two motorcycles a week coming off the production line. Customers could select from five colour schemes - British Racing Green, metallic blue or green, black with gold coachlines or plain red. There was also a Scott special edition in purple and cream - and a special scheme similar to Silk Cut cigarettes, which were popular at the time. [3]

The thermo-syphon cooling system boiled water using engine heat, then fed it back from the radiator in a rubber tube to the engine cases, where it boiled again, removing the need for a water pump.[3]

The Silk Engineering company was taken over by the Kendal based Furmanite International Group in 1976 who continued production of the Silk 700S and in 1977 it was upgraded to the 700S Mk2, which Silk called the Sabre. Improvements from the Mk 1 included finned cylinder barrels, a redesigned seat, instruments and rear light nacelle. In 1978 the 100th Silk motorcycle was produced and production continued until December 1979 when Silk realised they were losing £200 with every motorcycle sold.[1]


 



__________________
Bert   09 KTM 530 07 Triumph Tiger 1050  06 Kawasaki KLR650 07 Yamaha YZ 250 1976 Husky WR250 1978 Suzuki RM250 1981 Honda CM 400 W/Velorex Sidecar Because the ride shouldn't end just because the pavement does! May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. Harold McAlindon
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